When we first announced our JetStream Migrate solution last month, people asked “Can I use the software for live migration of on-premises workloads to VMware Cloud on AWS?”

 

The Answer: Yes, You Can!

Today, we announced that our partnership with VMware has grown to include support for VMware Cloud on AWS. Working with VMware (who provided us access to the VMware Cloud on AWS for testing purposes), we demonstrated how JetStream Migrate can empower cloud service providers in facilitating the live migration of virtual machines (VMs) from an on-premises data center to VMware Cloud on AWS.

 

The First of Its Kind

JetStream Migrate is the first solution for VM Migration that is integrated with VMware vSphere through the VMware vSphere APIs for IO Filters. This means is that the software automatically installs from a vSphere Installation Bundle (VIB) and is deployed and managed by vSphere rather than an external application.The lightweight software package is configured automatically by vSphere, making it the simplest and easiest ways to replicate data to the cloud for the purpose of live VM migration. Live migration is supported even when the VMs’ data is copied to an external storage device and shipped to the cloud provider’s data center.

 

JetStream Migrate is the first solution for VM Migration that is integrated with VMware vSphere through the VMware vSphere APIs for IO Filters.

 

This demonstration of our compatibility is especially exciting because it gave us a chance to try out the unique features of our data replication solution in a VM migration to VMware Cloud on AWS. As with any deployment of JetStream Migrate, the software uniquely installs in the on-premises Software Defined Data Center (SDDC) in a few minutes from a vSphere Installation Bundle (VIB) and runs as an IO Filter in the vSphere cluster. The migration is managed from vCenter, with just a single window in the Web client for managing and monitoring the replication of the VMs’ data. The data replication process works seamlessly with other VMware cloud solutions, including vRealize and NSX.

 

 

Testing Live Migration

For one of our demonstrations, a VM was migrated from our data center in San Jose, California, to the VMware Cloud on AWS Western Region data center located in Oregon. During the data migration process, we ran a code compile job (building a Linux kernel) on the VM. The purpose of the test was to show that the migration of the data could take place without stopping the activity on the VM and that the data at the destination would be consistent once migration was complete.

Among the tests we performed was bandwidth management. Even with just a 100Mbps connection to the US West data center, we initially tested with data replication throttled, which an administrator might consider if data is being replicated over a network shared with other applications. Of course, limiting the bandwidth available for data replication means the migration will take longer (fortunately, our prediction capability will tell you just how long). In a follow-up test, we instructed the replicator to consume the full 100Mbps, which it handled quite easily.

 

JetStream Migrate complements the VMware technology platform, addressing some important data replication requirements when migrating to VMware Cloud on AWS.

 

Throughout the process, the management server console provided complete historical statistics and current status. Key events were timestamped in the console as they completed, and upon successful migration, the software was automatically (and completely) unconfigured and uninstalled at the on-premises data center, leaving nothing but a log.

We’re excited about this new development in our partnership with VMware and quite pleased with the results of this testing. In particular, it shows how JetStream Migrate complements the VMware technology platform, addressing some important data replication requirements when migrating to VMware Cloud on AWS.

For more information about JetStream Migrate, take a look at this page, or contact JetStream Software.

First Seen in VMblog